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Streets through time - Church Street
No 7 The Lilacs

IMG20230306124018.jpg

Originally half of a pair of stone houses numbered 7 and 9 Church Street comprising a red brick front and pantile roof. It was built c. 1770 and remodeled in 1790, with late 19th and 20th century additions and alterations. There is a 1790 date plate on the front of The Lilacs, from when George de Ligne Gregory installed the brick front to the property.  Further additions and alterations have been made to the property in the 19th and 20th centuries.


No 7 and 9 Church Street used to be four homes, which consisted of a living room, on the ground floor with a bedroom upstairs that was accessed via a ladder.  

From 1902, number 7 was rented by John Marriott and his family, who moved here from Denton. 

The 1921 census record John (aged 77) his wife Mary (aged 60) and their four sons - Charles (33), Fred (25), Frank (23), Henry (21) and their two daughters - Emma (26) and Kate (24) being resident.

In 1927 John's son Frank Marriott married Ann Harris, the girl next door at The Ramblers, No. 9 Church Street (now known as The Old Post Office).

During the 1960s, Kate Marriott was interviewed by James Murden, a local historian. 


Kate moved into 7 Church Street in 1902 aged 4 or 5. Her father, John Marriott worked for Mr Burton who kept the Gregory Arms. He also delivered coal around the village. He later worked on a farm. 


She remembers the vicar Canon Jeudwine as being very strict. Everyone had to go to church and curtsey to his wife. She attended school in Harlaxton, where Mr Atkins was the head teacher. She left school at 14. Her mother, Mary Marriott had been a school teacher prior to her marriage. Kate had 5 brothers and 3 sisters, but in Harlaxton she only lived with her parents and four of her brothers.


When they moved to Harlaxton, their well had been filled in, so they had to use their neighbours. They had cow sheds behind the cottage. At Christmas, the squire would send them a joint of meat.
Every Tuesday and Saturday, she walked into Grantham. Later she cycled. Her sister, Min worked at Clifford’s fruit and veg shop in Watergate.


When she left school, she stayed at home and did housework for her mother. Kate was on the committee which helped to organise the building of the village hall. People bought a brick for donations ranging from 2/6d to 10/- and the foundation stone was laid in 1920.

In 1936, Kate married Ben Parkinson (Arthur B Parkinson).

 

In 1937,when the estate was sold off by Philip Sherwin Gregory, Mrs Marriott (Mary) was recorded as the tenant. The Annual Rent for the property was £10 16s 0d. The property was purchased by Captain Philip Grinling.


In 1939, Kate joined the WVS and knitted for the war effort.


After the war, Ben and Kate bought the house from Captain Grinling in 1947. 


Kate’s husband, Ben died in 1955.


The church had a big influence in Kates life and sang in the choir. Her sister was a bellringer.

Lot 41 SD cottage.jpg

A Street through time
No 7 The Lilacs

IMG20230306124018.jpg

Originally half of a pair of stone houses numbered 7 and 9 Church Street comprising a red brick front and pantile roof. It was built c. 1770 and remodeled in 1790, with late 19th and 20th century additions and alterations. There is a 1790 date plate on the front of The Lilacs, from when George de Ligne Gregory installed the brick front to the property.  Further additions and alterations have been made to the property in the 19th and 20th centuries.


No 7 and 9 Church Street used to be four homes, which consisted of a living room, on the ground floor with a bedroom upstairs that was accessed via a ladder. What is now the kitchen in The Lilacs would have once been a barn for the animals.

From 1902, number 7 was rented by John Marriott and his family, who moved here from Denton. 

In 1927 John's son Frank Marriott married Ann Harris, who lived next door at The Ramblers, No. 9 Church Street (now known as The Old Post Office).

During the 1960s, Kate Marriott was interviewed by James Murden, a local historian. 


Kate moved into 7 Church Street in 1902 aged 4 or 5. Her father, John Marriott worked for Mr Burton who kept the Gregory Arms. He also delivered coal around the village. He later worked on a farm. 


She remembers the vicar Canon Jeudwine as being very strict. Everyone had to go to church and curtsey to his wife. She attended school in Harlaxton, where Mr Atkins was the head teacher. She left school at 14. Her mother, Mary Marriott had been a school teacher prior to her marriage. Kate had 5 brothers and 3 sisters, but in Harlaxton she only lived with her parents and four of her brothers.


When they moved to Harlaxton, their well had been filled in, so they had to use their neighbours. They had cow sheds behind the cottage. At Christmas, the squire would send them a joint of meat.
Every Tuesday and Saturday, she walked into Grantham. Later she cycled. Her sister, Min worked at Clifford’s fruit and veg shop in Watergate.


When she left school, she stayed at home and did housework for her mother. Kate was on the committee which helped to organise the building of the village hall. People bought a brick for donations ranging from 2/6d to 10/- and the foundation stone was laid in 1920.

In 1936, she married Ben Parkinson (Arthur B Parkinson).  In 1937, Mrs Marriott was recorded as the tenant.  The Annual Rent for the property was £10 16s 0d.


In 1939, Kate joined the WVS and knitted for the war effort.


After the war, Ben and Kate bought the house from Captain Philip Grinling in 1947, who purchased it in 1937 when the estate was sold off by Philip Sherwin Gregory.  


Kate’s husband, Ben died in 1955.


The church had a big influence in her life, and she sang in the choir. Her sister was a bellringer.

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